Sunday, January 24, 2016

heritage sweater progress

The sweater evolves!

We've reached the armhole, folks.  You'll notice that I've had some difficulty deciding what cable pattern to use.  Another odd design feature to match the specks of un-dyed yarn.

My dad has dug out the old sweaters that his mom made for him, but the one that I'm replicating doesn't seem to be among them, based on the descriptions I heard over the phone. Or, it's quite possible that I'm remembering, or not remembering the sweater accurately.  Memory is notorious for being inaccurate, despite our perceptions of remembering something in vivid detail!

Thursday, January 21, 2016

New Heritage Sweater

My grandmother taught me to knit when I was 7.  I have no actual recollection of the learning process, but have pieced together evidence that it happened then.  It wasn't until I was 20 that knitting appealed to me, and then it quickly became the obsession that it remains today.  I have wondered how much that early experience laid the tracks for this intense focus on all things yarn.  I know that I greatly admired my grandmother, and over the years I have seen, and even worn, some of her beautiful work. I acquired from my dad one sweater that I liked very much: a dark red pull-over that had one cable along the side, with twisted rib edges and a wide, high neck.  It was frayed around the edges when I got it, and I wore it that way for awhile. I don't know what happened to the sweater, and I had not thought of it in years (Okay, DECADES) until last month when Oogy gave me some undyed Cascade 220 to play with.  Something about the yarn's heft and ply made me think of the frayed red sweater.

I dyed it with ProChem dye "cape cod cranberry".  My dye pot would hold only 3 skeins, so there are 2 dye-lots that miraculously appear to be the same color. 
They are not perfect--some areas around where the skeins were tied did not get saturated with the dye, so there are intermittent light spots. I have convinced myself, and have been encouraged by a few Camel Knitters, to accept these as legitimate design elements. 

I'm replicating the frayed red sweater that Grandma made for Dad, updating the style just a bit.


Friday, January 15, 2016


Each time I begin a new fair isle project I rediscover how much I enjoy watching the yarn transform into a pattern.  And then, it transforms again when it gets washed and the stitches gel.
Harrisville Shetland Cones in White and Tundra

Rows 1-30, Chart A of Crazed Scandinavian Cowl by Wendy Johnson

Once it's washed, the pattern is very clear and the yarn loses it's stiffness.